Wednesday, October 31, 2018

Happy Halloween !!


Through the ages, various supernatural entities , including fairies and witches came to be associated with Halloween, and more than a century ago in Ireland, the event was said to be a time when spirits of the dead could return to their old haunting grounds.Though few people realize it as they're slapping creepy holiday address labels onto their scary party invitations and carving jack-o'-lanterns to look like bats or witches, the Halloween we celebrate today is a curious combination of the old and the new. 

Its roots are ancient, beginning with traditions celebrated by the pre-Christian Celts who once inhabited the British Isles. Halloween, also known as All Hallows' Eve, can be traced back about 2,000 years to a pre-Christian Celtic festival held around Nov. 1 called Samhain (pronounced "sah-win"), which means "summer's end" in Gaelic, according to the Indo-European Etymological Dictionaries. Because ancient records are sparse and fragmentary, the exact nature of Samhain is not fully understood, but it was an annual communal meeting at the end of the harvest year, a time to gather resources for the winter months and bring animals back from the pastures. Samhain is also thought to have been a time of communing with the dead, according to folklorist John Santino. Back then, it mostly involved eating a lot, cleaning the household, extinguishing the hearth fires and restarting them in a gesture of renewal, commemorating those who had passed away during the year, and dancing around a communal bonfire. 
Many Wiccan groups still practice these types of celebration rituals today during Samhain festivals. Some evangelical Christians have expressed concern that Halloween is somehow satanic because of its roots in pagan ritual. However, ancient Celts did not worship anything resembling the Christian devil and had no concept of it. While many Wiccans do refer to themselves as "witches", they do NOT worship the Devil or any other evil deity for that matter. The vast majority of Wiccan practices can be characterized by or expressing goodwill or kindly feelings which they derive from nature oriented practices derived from pre-Christian religions. 
The history of Halloween we know today is actually a Christian creation. It all started in the 800s, when the Catholic Church merged two existing Roman festivals called Feralia and Pomona's Day with Samhain, in a successful attempt to replace all three. Pomona's Day was originally a harvest festival in honor of the Roman goddess of fruits and trees and Feralia was a day for mourning and remembering the dead.
Christians began celebrating All Saints Day on November 1, with observances beginning at sunset the night before. Among other things, people dressed in costumes as Christian saints to scare away evil spirits, and then went door-to-door, begging for food. Sound familiar? Later on All Soul's Day (a holiday commemorating the dead who were not saints) was added to the mix on November 2. Celebrants took to going from house to house asking for little soul cakes (currant buns) in exchange for praying for the souls of a household's dead. By 1500 AD, All Saints and All Soul's Days had evolved into Hallow Time (October 31-November 2), with most of the celebrations occurring the night before All Hallows Day  on All Hallows Eve. 

It wasn't long before "All Hallows Eve" evolved into "Hallowe'en." So every October, carved pumpkins peer out from porches and doorsteps in the United States and other parts of the world.Gourd-like orange fruits inscribed with ghoulish faces and illuminated by candles are a sure sign of the Halloween season. The practice of decorating “jack-o’-lanterns” the name comes from an Irish folktale about a man named Stingy Jack. 

The Legend of “Stingy Jack”

According to the story, Stingy Jack invited the Devil to have a drink with him. True to his name, Stingy Jack didn’t want to pay for his drink, so he convinced the Devil to turn himself into a coin that Jack could use to buy their drinks. Once the Devil did so, Jack decided to keep the money and put it into his pocket next to a silver cross, which prevented the Devil from changing back into his original form. Jack eventually freed the Devil, under the condition that he would not bother Jack for one year and that, should Jack die, he would not claim his soul. The next year, Jack again tricked the Devil into climbing into a tree to pick a piece of fruit. While he was up in the tree, Jack carved a sign of the cross into the tree’s bark so that the Devil could not come down until the Devil promised Jack not to bother him for ten more years. Soon after, Jack died. As the legend goes, God would not allow such an unsavory figure into heaven. The Devil, upset by the trick Jack had played on him and keeping his word not to claim his soul, would not allow Jack into hell. He sent Jack off into the dark night with only a burning coal to light his way. Jack put the coal into a carved-out pumpkin and has been roaming the Earth with ever since. The Irish began to refer to this ghostly figure as “Jack of the Lantern,” and then, simply “Jack O’Lantern.” In Ireland and Scotland, people began to make their own versions of Jack’s lanterns by carving scary faces into turnips or potatoes and placing them into windows or near doors to frighten away Stingy Jack and other wandering evil spirits. In England, large beets are used. Immigrants from these countries brought the jack o’lantern tradition with them when they came to the United States. They soon found that pumpkins, a fruit native to America, make perfect jack-o’-lanterns.
Tricks and games
These days, the "trick" part of the phrase "trick or treat" is mostly an empty threat, but pranks have long been a part of the holiday. By the late 1800s, the tradition of playing tricks was well established.
 In the United States and Canada, the pranks included tipping over outhouses, opening farmers' gates and egging houses. But by the 1920s and '30s, the celebrations more closely resembled an unruly block party, and the acts of vandalism got more serious. Some people believe that because pranking was starting to get dangerous and out of hand, parents and town leaders began to encourage dressing up and trick-or-treating as a safe alternative to doing pranks. People began dressing up as ghosts or gouls. It became fashionable, as the holiday became more widespread and more commercialized and with the arrival of mass-manufactured costumes, the selection of disguises for kids and adults greatly expanded beyond monsters to include everything from superheroes to princesses to crooked politicians, and witches...


Wednesday, October 10, 2018

It's All About Pumpkins This Month !!

                                It's Fall and so our lives are consumed with the color orange

The images of Halloween Jack-O Lanterns are everywhere, but what about pumpkins are they really healthy? Well, if they weren't you could bet I wouldn't be writing this article! Let's see, how about some history. Pumpkins are believed to have originated in North America.

Seeds from related plants have been found in Mexico dating back to 5500 B.C. So references to pumpkins date back many centuries. The name pumpkin originated from the Greek word for "large melon" which is "pepon." "Pepon" was changed by the French into "pompon." The English changed "pompon" to "Pumpion." American colonists changed "pumpion" into "pumpkin." All the while Native American's were using pumpkin as a staple in their diets centuries long before the pilgrims landed. They also dried strips of pumpkin and wove them into mats. Native Americans would also roast long strips of pumpkin on the open fire and eat them. When the European settlers arrived, they saw the pumpkins grown by the natives, and pumpkin soon became a staple in their diets. The early settlers used them in a wide variety of recipes from desserts to stews and soups, and even made beer out of it.

The origin of pumpkin pie is thought to have occurred when the colonists sliced off the pumpkin top, removed the seeds, and then filled it with milk, spices and honey. The pumpkin was then baked in the hot ashes of a dying fire. Pumpkins are a member of the Cucurbita family which includes squash and cucumbers. Pumpkin flowers are also edible. The pumpkin blossoms can be eaten, batter-dipped and fried. Pumpkins range in size from less than 1 pound to over 1,000 pounds. The current world record holder is  Tim Mathison. On October 11, 2013, Tim brought his now world record 2032 pound pumpkin to the Uesugi Farms Pumpkin Park Weigh-off at Morgan Hill, Ca. For cooking purposes, you should pick the smaller sizes, they will have more tender, tasty flesh. Select pumpkins which are free of blemishes, harvested with their stems intact, and pick the ones that feel heavy for their size. There are so many roadside pumpkin stands this time of year, pull over and see what they have to offer. Unless they are waxed by the grower, a shiny skin indicates the squash was picked too soon. Look for a dull finish. For extended storage, you should wash the skin in a solution of about a tablespoon of chlorine bleach to a gallon of water to disinfect the skin and discourage mold or rot. Then dry your pumpkin immediately because dampness encourages spoilage. If you find mold, wipe it with vegetable oil to remove the mold and seal the spot.

The Orange Bulldog pumpkin, is resistant to the wilt, and viruses that would plague more traditional-looking varieties. These pumpkins are generally more squat than round, and can range in size up to 30 pounds. It's open-pollinated seed so there's a pretty wide variation in the fruit. If you don't carve it, it will last forever you can treat it like butternut squash, storing it in the pantry through the fall and winter. So if we have a zombie apocalypse, you can survive on this pumpkin.

Now while pumpkins are a tasty source of vitamins, and minerals, particularly beta-carotene, vitamin C, A, and potassium which helps prevent arteriosclerosis, that can lead to strokes or heart attacks. The real fun is in the seeds. While pumpkin seeds are available year round, they are the freshest in the fall when pumpkins are in season. The health benefits of eating pumpkin seeds are well known. Let's look at some. The high content of zinc makes them beneficial for the prostate. They reduce inflammation. They can also protect against the parasites in the intestines, and their anti-inflammatory properties, and can help lower blood cholesterol too.

The seeds are also good sources of protein, as well as iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, and potassium. About a quarter-cup of seeds can provide over 20% of the recommended daily iron intake. According to the USDA, one gram of roasted seeds contain 5.69 mg L-tryptophan and one gram of seed protein contains 17.2 mg of L-tryptophan. (One cup of milk contains 183 mg.) This high tryptophan content makes pumpkin seeds interesting to researchers studying the treatment of anxiety disorders.  So it stands to reason you could eat the seeds as preventative measure against onset of anxiety attacks, mild depression and other mood disorders. About 100grm. of pumpkin seeds, about a handful, contains 30% protein.
The carotenoids found in pumpkin seeds, and the omega-3 fats found in pumpkin seeds are also being studied for their potential prostate benefits. Men with higher amounts of carotenoids in their diet have less risk for BPH (enlarged prostate). Zinc in pumpkin seeds might also impact prostate function. In animal studies, the addition of pumpkin seeds to the diet has compared favorably with use of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin in reducing inflammatory symptoms.

However the pumpkin seeds did not have any of the side-effects of the drug indomethacin. Pumpkin seeds do not increase the level of damaged fats in the linings of the joints, a side-effect that actually contributes to arthritis. In a study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers published the amounts of phytosterols present in nuts and seeds commonly eaten in the United States. Phytosterols are believed to reduce blood levels of cholesterol, enhance the immune response and decrease risk of certain cancers. Pistachios, and sunflower seeds were richest in phytosterols, followed by pumpkin seeds. They keep fresh for a long time, If you keep them in a quality, food storage container. Not only do they taste good, they are packed with alpha and beta carotene, potassium, magnesium, zinc, vitamins A and E and other nutrients with only 15 cal per 100 grams. Pumpkin's and their seeds are without a doubt, one of nature's wonder food's.
Try some pumpkin deserts, and breads at your local bakery this season. If they aren't part of your regular diet now, try some seeds this season too. You certainly can't knock the benefits. You can buy them in the shells, and shell them yourself, or buy them already shelled. I suggest you don't buy them out of huge bins at the health food store, because they don't stay fresh, and a little moisture can ruin the batch. Sprinkle them on  over grilled fish, in salads, or eat them by themselves. Use your imagination. I even mix mine with  a little chili powder, for a change up. It's always better to buy your seeds or nuts unsalted, if you don't like them unsalted, add your own quality sea salt.

Also if you are old enough, and you like beer, try a Pumpkin Ale this year it's seasonal, and tastes great, and by all means if you spot a pumpkin maiden at a farm stand on the side of the road this year stop and sample her wares. Good Luck...






Doc's Fitness Tip's Publishes Weekly. (mostly)

For your entertainment and education, "Flex-Appeal" Personal Training Service, publishes Doc's Fitness Tip's Located In Dana Point, California. We also serve the communities of, San Juan Capistrano, San Clemente, Laguna Beach, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Hills, Aliso Viejo, and MissionViejo,Ca. We specialize in body sculpting, and adventure sport balance, core, and endurance training.

Flex-Appeal is currently offering, for new customers, a 2 for 1 personal training special that allows you to get personally trained, and bring a friend for FREE


Get off your butt, this offer will end soon!
Call - (949) 443-0133 for details of Orange County's premier personal trainer experience!
 

For the best Personal Fitness Training in Orange County, California:
Contact us at, docsactivex@yahoo.com 
or (949) 443-0133 M-F 9am-4pm

Thanks,

Doc Masters











Thursday, September 20, 2018

Fall Means Apples !!

                                   
                                        Ever since Adam and Eve, it's been associated with sin

In the story of Adam and Eve, the apple became a symbol for knowledge, immortality, temptation, and the vehicle of man's falling into sin. Today, we refer to something we prize as, "The apple of our eye" Historically, carbonized remains of apples have been found by archeologists in prehistoric lake dwellings in Switzerland, dating back to the Iron Age. There is also evidence to show that apples were eaten and preserved by slicing and sun drying them during the Stone Age in Europe.

The first remains of apples that were found, are from around 6,500 B.C. in excavations at Jericho in the Jordan Valley. Also around 5,000 B.C. Feng Li, a Chinese diplomat, gave up his prestigious government position when he became consumed by grafting apples as a commercial venture according to "The Precious Book of Enrichment." Greek and Roman mythology referred to apples as symbols of love and beauty. Jump ahead to 1665 Sir Isaac Newton watches an apple fall to the ground, and wondering why it fell in a straight line, is inspired to discover the laws of gravity and motion. Robert Prince in 1737 established the first commercial apple tree nursery in America called William Prince Nursery in Flushing, New York. One of America's fondest legends is that of Johnny Appleseed, a folk hero and pioneer apple farmer in the 1800's. Well there really was a Johnny Appleseed, and his true name was John Chapmen.


His dream was for the land to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry. Most historians today classify him as an eccentric but very smart businessman, who traveled around the new territories of his time, leasing land and developing nurseries of apple trees. It is estimated that he traveled 100,000 square miles of frontier country. 


 Here's some fun Apple facts:
  • There are 7,500 different apple varieties worldwide, and 2,500 grow in the U.S.
  • Apples can be as small as a cherry or as large as a grapefruit
  • Apple trees don't grow from seeds, they are grafted or budded
  • Apple trees can live to be 100 years old
  • 61% of apples are eaten fresh and 39% are processed into juice and sauce
  • Red Delicious is the most widely grown followed by Golden Delicious
  • Two pounds of apples make one 9-inch pie.
  • A medium apple is about 80 calories.
  • Apples are a great source of the fiber pectin. One apple has five grams of fiber.
  • The pilgrims planted the first United States apple trees in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • 25 percent of an apple's volume is air. That is why they float.
  • The largest apple picked weighed 3.2 pounds.
"An Apple A Day Keeps The Doctor Away"

In the past five years, no area of apple research has been more dynamic than the area of apple polyphenols. The balance of  phytonutrients in apples is more unique than many researchers previously suspected. In terms of flavonols, quercetin is the primary phytonutrient found in apples, and it's far more concentrated in the skin than in the pulp. You might wonder why apples end up with such an amazing array of polyphenols. The recent research studies show polyphenols to be the favorite mechanism used by apples to protect themselves from UV-B sun radiation. Multiple studies have shown apple intake to be associated with decreased risk of asthma. French researchers found that a flavanoid called phloridzin that is found only in apples may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and may also increase bone density. Boron, another ingredient in apples, also strengthens bones. A study on mice at Cornell University found that the quercetin in apples may protect brain cells from the kind of free radical damage that may lead to Alzheimer's disease.

Another Cornell University study found that rats who ate one apple per day reduced their risk of breast cancer by 17%. Rats fed three apples per day reduced their risk by 39% and those fed six apples per day reduced their risk by 44%. The pectin in apples, supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body's need for insulin and may help in the management of diabetes. Since most of the polyphenols in apples function as antioxidants, it's not surprising to see so many health benefit studies focusing on the antioxidant benefits from apple. Particularly strong is the ability of apples to decrease oxidation of cell membrane fats. This benefit is especially important in our cardiovascular system since oxidation of fat in the membranes of cells that line our blood vessels is a primary risk factor for clogging of the arteries.

The cardiovascular benefits of apples are well-documented in research studies, and they are closely associated with two aspects of apple nutrients, their water-soluble fiber, pectin content, and their unusual mix of polyphenols. Total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol are both decreased by eating  apples. Preliminary reliable health benefits of apples have  been established for several age-related health problems, like macular degeneration of the eye. According to a study of 10,000 people, those who ate the most apples had a 50% lower risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers believe this is due to the high levels of the flavonoids quercetin and naringin in apples. Researchers also claim lung cancer, and anti-asthma benefits. The pectin in apples supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body's need for insulin, and may help in the management of diabetes.
The apple is actually a member of the Rose family, Golden and Red Delicious apples are mild and sweet, while Pippins and Granny Smith apples are notably tart. Tart apples, that keep their texture during cooking, are preferred for cooked desserts like apple pie. Delicious apples, and other sweeter varieties like Rome and Fuji apples are usually eaten raw. Whole apples are a much better nutritional choice than apple juice. Not only are whole apples richer in dietary fiber, but the current processes of juicing seem to drastically reduce the polyphenolic phytonutrient concentrations originally found in the whole fruit. You've no doubt heard the saying, "one bad apple can spoil the whole bunch." Well, research studies agree. An apple that has been bruised from being dropped, or  damaged in some other way, it will start to release ethylene gas. Ethylene gas can damage the other apples. So handle your fruit with a little TLC, and remove any damaged apples from groups of apples that you are going to store store.
  • Popular varieties for eating are; gala, granny smiths, golden delicious, pink ladies, fujis, jonathons, mutsu, red delicious and spartans.
  • Other eating varieties are; cox orange pippins (very popular apple in England), braeburns (popular New Zealand graft variety), lady williams and gravensteins.
  • Apples that are good for cooking; granny smiths, cox orange pippins, gravensteins, lady williams and golden delicious.

Now, to diffuse an urban myth, apple seeds  do contain a small amount of cyanide, which is a lethal poison, but you are protected from the toxin by the hard seed coating. If you eat whole apple and seeds, they pass through your digestive system relatively untouched. If you chew the seeds thoroughly, you will be exposed to the chemicals inside the seeds, but the dose of toxins in an apple is small enough that most adult's can easily detoxify it, but possibly not children.So tell the kid's don't eat the core, where the seeds are. Aside from eating raw apples there there are the deserts. I don't think many of us can ignore the captivating aroma of a fresh out of the oven warm, but cooling apple pie, tarts, or fritters.

Or maybe the mouth watering delight of a caramel dipped, or candied apple on a stick rolled in your favorite chopped nuts. Or a warm mug of apple cider, by a cozy fire after a long day of skiing. Or apple sauce with our turkey on Thanksgiving. Is there anything funnier than watching a bunch of kids bob for apples? You see apples aren't only good for us, they are just plain good. FYI according to the Environmental Working Group's 2013 report "Shopper's Guide to Pesticides," conventionally grown apples are among the top 12 fruits and vegetables on which excessive pesticide residues have been most frequently found.

Therefore, to avoid pesticide-associated health risks, avoid eating apples unless they're organic. If you want to roll the dice, and purchase non-organic apples, you may want to ask your grocer about the kind of wax used to protect the apple's surface during storage or shipping. Carnauba wax (from the carnauba palm tree), beeswax, and  shellac (from the lac beetle) are preferable to petroleum-based waxes, which contain solvent residues or wood resins. Eat them raw, eat them cooked, or another favorite have them with your favorite vodka. It's no secret apples are one of the truly great foods we could always add more of, to our lives. Good Luck...


Appletini / Apple Martini


It's best to chill both the vodka and the apple pucker. 
2 oz. Vodka
1/2 oz. Apple Pucker Schnapps or, 
1/2 oz. Apple Juice or Cider  

Combine ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  
Garnish with an Apple Slice




Chocolate Dipped Apple Slices





Doc's Fitness Tip's Publishes Weekly. (mostly)

For your entertainment and education, "Flex-Appeal" Personal Training Service, publishes Doc's Fitness Tip's Located In Dana Point, California. We also serve the communities of, San Juan Capistrano, San Clemente, Laguna Beach, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Hills, Aliso Viejo, and MissionViejo,Ca. We specialize in body sculpting, and adventure sport; balance, core, and endurance training.

Flex-Appeal is currently offering, for new customers, a 2 for 1 personal training special that allows you to get personally trained, and bring a friend for FREE


Get off your butt, this offer will end soon!
Call - (949) 443-0133 for details of our premier personal trainer experience
 in Orange County, California:
Contact us at, docsactivex@yahoo.co 
or (949) 443-0133 M-F 9am-4pm

Thanks,

Doc Masters







Friday, August 31, 2018

Honey: The Sweet That Never Spoils...

                                   
                                        Ever since Adam and Eve, it's been associated with sin

In the story of Adam and Eve, the apple became a symbol for knowledge, immortality, temptation, and the vehicle of man's falling into sin. Today, we refer to something we prize as, "The apple of our eye" Historically, carbonized remains of apples have been found by archeologists in prehistoric lake dwellings in Switzerland, dating back to the Iron Age. There is also evidence to show that apples were eaten and preserved by slicing and sun drying them during the Stone Age in Europe.

The first remains of apples that were found, are from around 6,500 B.C. in excavations at Jericho in the Jordan Valley. Also around 5,000 B.C. Feng Li, a Chinese diplomat, gave up his prestigious government position when he became consumed by grafting apples as a commercial venture according to "The Precious Book of Enrichment." Greek and Roman mythology referred to apples as symbols of love and beauty. Jump ahead to 1665 Sir Isaac Newton watches an apple fall to the ground, and wondering why it fell in a straight line, is inspired to discover the laws of gravity and motion. Robert Prince in 1737 established the first commercial apple tree nursery in America called William Prince Nursery in Flushing, New York. One of America's fondest legends is that of Johnny Appleseed, a folk hero and pioneer apple farmer in the 1800's. Well there really was a Johnny Appleseed, and his true name was John Chapmen.


His dream was for the land to produce so many apples that no one would ever go hungry. Most historians today classify him as an eccentric but very smart businessman, who traveled around the new territories of his time, leasing land and developing nurseries of apple trees. It is estimated that he traveled 100,000 square miles of frontier country. 


 Here's some fun Apple facts:
  • There are 7,500 different apple varieties worldwide, and 2,500 grow in the U.S.
  • Apples can be as small as a cherry or as large as a grapefruit
  • Apple trees don't grow from seeds, they are grafted or budded
  • Apple trees can live to be 100 years old
  • 61% of apples are eaten fresh and 39% are processed into juice and sauce
  • Red Delicious is the most widely grown followed by Golden Delicious
  • Two pounds of apples make one 9-inch pie.
  • A medium apple is about 80 calories.
  • Apples are a great source of the fiber pectin. One apple has five grams of fiber.
  • The pilgrims planted the first United States apple trees in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • 25 percent of an apple's volume is air. That is why they float.
  • The largest apple picked weighed 3.2 pounds.
"An Apple A Day Keeps The Doctor Away"

In the past five years, no area of apple research has been more dynamic than the area of apple polyphenols. The balance of  phytonutrients in apples is more unique than many researchers previously suspected. In terms of flavonols, quercetin is the primary phytonutrient found in apples, and it's far more concentrated in the skin than in the pulp. You might wonder why apples end up with such an amazing array of polyphenols. The recent research studies show polyphenols to be the favorite mechanism used by apples to protect themselves from UV-B sun radiation. Multiple studies have shown apple intake to be associated with decreased risk of asthma. French researchers found that a flavanoid called phloridzin that is found only in apples may protect post-menopausal women from osteoporosis and may also increase bone density. Boron, another ingredient in apples, also strengthens bones. A study on mice at Cornell University found that the quercetin in apples may protect brain cells from the kind of free radical damage that may lead to Alzheimer's disease.

Another Cornell University study found that rats who ate one apple per day reduced their risk of breast cancer by 17%. Rats fed three apples per day reduced their risk by 39% and those fed six apples per day reduced their risk by 44%. The pectin in apples, supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body's need for insulin and may help in the management of diabetes. Since most of the polyphenols in apples function as antioxidants, it's not surprising to see so many health benefit studies focusing on the antioxidant benefits from apple. Particularly strong is the ability of apples to decrease oxidation of cell membrane fats. This benefit is especially important in our cardiovascular system since oxidation of fat in the membranes of cells that line our blood vessels is a primary risk factor for clogging of the arteries.

The cardiovascular benefits of apples are well-documented in research studies, and they are closely associated with two aspects of apple nutrients, their water-soluble fiber, pectin content, and their unusual mix of polyphenols. Total cholesterol, and LDL-cholesterol are both decreased by eating  apples. Preliminary reliable health benefits of apples have  been established for several age-related health problems, like macular degeneration of the eye. According to a study of 10,000 people, those who ate the most apples had a 50% lower risk of developing lung cancer. Researchers believe this is due to the high levels of the flavonoids quercetin and naringin in apples. Researchers also claim lung cancer, and anti-asthma benefits. The pectin in apples supplies galacturonic acid to the body which lowers the body's need for insulin, and may help in the management of diabetes.
The apple is actually a member of the Rose family, Golden and Red Delicious apples are mild and sweet, while Pippins and Granny Smith apples are notably tart. Tart apples, that keep their texture during cooking, are preferred for cooked desserts like apple pie. Delicious apples, and other sweeter varieties like Rome and Fuji apples are usually eaten raw. Whole apples are a much better nutritional choice than apple juice. Not only are whole apples richer in dietary fiber, but the current processes of juicing seem to drastically reduce the polyphenolic phytonutrient concentrations originally found in the whole fruit. You've no doubt heard the saying, "one bad apple can spoil the whole bunch." Well, research studies agree. An apple that has been bruised from being dropped, or  damaged in some other way, it will start to release ethylene gas. Ethylene gas can damage the other apples. So handle your fruit with a little TLC, and remove any damaged apples from groups of apples that you are going to store store.
  • Popular varieties for eating are; gala, granny smiths, golden delicious, pink ladies, fujis, jonathons, mutsu, red delicious and spartans.
  • Other eating varieties are; cox orange pippins (very popular apple in England), braeburns (popular New Zealand graft variety), lady williams and gravensteins.
  • Apples that are good for cooking; granny smiths, cox orange pippins, gravensteins, lady williams and golden delicious.

Now, to diffuse an urban myth, apple seeds  do contain a small amount of cyanide, which is a lethal poison, but you are protected from the toxin by the hard seed coating. If you eat whole apple and seeds, they pass through your digestive system relatively untouched. If you chew the seeds thoroughly, you will be exposed to the chemicals inside the seeds, but the dose of toxins in an apple is small enough that most adult's can easily detoxify it, but possibly not children.So tell the kid's don't eat the core, where the seeds are. Aside from eating raw apples there there are the deserts. I don't think many of us can ignore the captivating aroma of a fresh out of the oven warm, but cooling apple pie, tarts, or fritters.

Or maybe the mouth watering delight of a caramel dipped, or candied apple on a stick rolled in your favorite chopped nuts. Or a warm mug of apple cider, by a cozy fire after a long day of skiing. Or apple sauce with our turkey on Thanksgiving. Is there anything funnier than watching a bunch of kids bob for apples? You see apples aren't only good for us, they are just plain good. FYI according to the Environmental Working Group's 2013 report "Shopper's Guide to Pesticides," conventionally grown apples are among the top 12 fruits and vegetables on which excessive pesticide residues have been most frequently found.

Therefore, to avoid pesticide-associated health risks, avoid eating apples unless they're organic. If you want to roll the dice, and purchase non-organic apples, you may want to ask your grocer about the kind of wax used to protect the apple's surface during storage or shipping. Carnauba wax (from the carnauba palm tree), beeswax, and  shellac (from the lac beetle) are preferable to petroleum-based waxes, which contain solvent residues or wood resins. Eat them raw, eat them cooked, or another favorite have them with your favorite vodka. It's no secret apples are one of the truly great foods we could always add more of, to our lives. Good Luck...


Appletini / Apple Martini


It's best to chill both the vodka and the apple pucker. 
2 oz. Vodka
1/2 oz. Apple Pucker Schnapps or, 
1/2 oz. Apple Juice or Cider  

Combine ingredients in a shaker with ice. Shake well and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.  
Garnish with an Apple Slice




Chocolate Dipped Apple Slices




Doc's Fitness Tip's Publishes Weekly. (mostly)

For your entertainment and education, "Flex-Appeal" Personal Training Service, publishes Doc's Fitness Tip's Located In Dana Point, California. We also serve the communities of, San Juan Capistrano, San Clemente, Laguna Beach, Laguna Niguel, Laguna Hills, Aliso Viejo, and MissionViejo,Ca. We specialize in body sculpting, and adventure sport; balance, core, and endurance training.

Flex-Appeal is currently offering, for new customers, a 2 for 1 personal training special that allows you to get personally trained, and bring a friend for FREE


Get off your butt, this offer will end soon!
Call - (949) 443-0133 for details of a premier personal trainer experience
 in Orange County, California:
Contact us at, docsactivex@yahoo.co 
or (949) 443-0133 M-F 9am-4pm

Thanks,

Doc Masters








Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Bring Home The Bacon...

Now That We're Not Afraid Of Natural Fats Anymore, Right ?

Feel free to bring home the bacon, since we all know now that trans-fats (hydrogenated oils) high fructose corn syrup, and sugar are the culprits behind clogged arteries, and the obesity epidemic in the US. So let's talk Bacon. If you aren't a Jew or a Muslim you're gonna love this one ! (if so my apologies, see you next week with a new tip.) Now let's get started. Bacon is a cured meat, meaning that you use a natural way to prevent the meat from spoiling by way of salt, and often nitrites. Bacon traditionally comes from a pig. Although fake bacon recently has appeared made from turkey and other products. Which may have less saturated fat but is questionably healthier than good ole pork bacon. Pork bacon consists of both the meat of the pig, plus the fat, known as lard. Bacon usually comes from either the belly of the pig, the back or the sides. The amount of fat or lard in bacon depends on how fat the pig is, with the belly usually being fattier than the back, especially in America.

There are bacon beers, bacon bikini's, bacon martinis, bacon burgers, bacon ice-cream, bacon coffee, bacon candy, bacon toothpaste, bacon condiments, bacon, oh well you get the idea. We as Americans LOVE bacon ! By now you should be over the turkey industry telling you their product is healthier than pork baconBecause if you actually spent time reading the label of turkey bacon, you'd see it contains a laundry list of ingredients, many of which are not good for you such as hydrolyzed corn gluten, soy protein, wheat gluten, disodium inosintae, silicon dioxide and nitrites. Well today you're going to learn how to find your way around pork bacon. First a little history. In ancient times, whenever man found wild boar, he domesticated it, kept it, cared for it, and looked upon his pigs like a flock of little refrigerators with feet, they were future dinners waddling around the pen. From Europe to Asia to New Guinea, wherever wild boar were found, they were quickly turned into captive pork-making machines You are probably familiar with the phrase "bring home the bacon." In the twelfth century, a church in the English town of Dunmow promised a side of bacon to any married man who could swear before the congregation and God that he had not quarreled with his wife for a year and a day. A husband who could bring home the bacon was held in high esteem by the community for his patience. Bacon or bacoun was a Middle English term used to refer to all pork in general. The term bacon comes from various Germanic and French dialects. It derives from the French bako, Old High German bakko, and Old Teutonic backe, all of which refer to the back. Now there are special breeds of pigs particularly raised for bacon, notably the Yorkshire and Tamworth, and...FYI
  • Bacon is one of the oldest meats in history dating back to 1500 BC.
  • In the 16th Century, European peasants would proudly display the small amount of bacon they could afford.
  • 70% of all bacon in the US is eaten at breakfast.
  • Over 2 billion pounds of bacon is produced each year in the US.
  • Until the first world war, bacon fat was the cooking fat of choice in most US households.
The first large-scale bacon curing business was set up in the 1770's by John Harris in Wiltshire, England. Today, Wiltshire remains the main bacon-producing area of Britain. Columbus liked bacon. He brought pigs to the New World. John Harris liked bacon. We celebrate Columbus day every year. I think we should start celebrating Harris Day, too. At the very least, the man should have some statues raised in his honor. It took until 1924 before we had pre-packaged bacon, arranged in slices, the way we most commonly see it today. The Oscar Mayer company is responsible for that, and for the shingled arrangement of bacon in its package. It's not as if Americans didn't eat bacon before 1924. We ate plenty. But we are a lazy people, and the minute that bacon became a convenience food, and we didn't have to slice of a slab ourselves, we went crazy for it. 25 years later, 3 million companies were producing pork products in the United States, and most of those were makin' bacon. At this point in history, bacon was merely a food. It was eaten for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It was a survival protein during the Great Depression, because it was cheap and kept a little bit longer than other meats, and was as common as dirt. No one talked about bacon. No one obsessed over bacon. Bacon was just was an indestructible element of the American diet, as common as air.

Sadly some people still think saturated fats are evil, and as a result have banned bacon from their homes. However, fatty acid experts today emphasize that saturated fat from natural sources like meats, dairy, and tropical oils like coconut, and palm are not detrimental for our  health, but instead much better than the polyunsaturated and hydrogenated substitutes we've been recently using. Sure, maybe it's confusing to try and tell yourself that saturated fat isn't bad like we once thought. However, it's important that you realize that we were fed lies and deception that only made us fatter, sicker and more unhealthy. We need to change this way of thinking.
The bottom line is that saturated fats, like that found in bacon CAN and SHOULD fit into a healthy diet. A  healthy diet is low in sugar, processed carbohydrates, and synthetic chemicals, artificial sweeteners, or high fructose corn syrup, but high in fresh organic low-pesticide fruits, and vegetables, organic grass fed meats, wild caught fish, and organic nuts and seeds. To  understand why bacon, and the fat it's rich in, (lard) is a healthy choice for us to use in our diets along with other beneficial fats and proteins, let's look at the nutritional science of this food.

Stay with me now, if we take 1 tablespoon of pure lard, we see that is consists of an even balance of saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids, with some polyunsaturates and cholesterol (all animal fats contain cholesterol), but no trans fats. Specifically, it contains*:

• 5.9 grams of saturated fatty acids
• 6.4 grams monounsaturated fatty acids
• 2 grams polyunsaturated fatty acids (mostly omega-6)
• 14 mg cholesterol
* analysis from Mass Spectrometry at Univeristy of Alberta, 2003



If you compare lard to vegetable shortening, you get**:
• 3.8 grams saturated fatty acids
• 6.7 grams monounsaturated fatty acids
• 3.9 grams polyunsaturated fatty acids (mostly omega-6)
• 2 grams trans fatty acids (man-made)
• 0 mg cholesterol
**anaylsis from ESHA Food Processor


The trans fats, this man-made, fake lard substitute, has now been linked directly to heart disease morbidity and mortality, and there is a strong move to rid our shelves of this dangerous fat as soon as possible. As recently as this Friday the FDA is announcing it is moving to ban trans-fats. If your label reads hydrogenated oil those are trans fats !

According to about.com packaged sliced bacon can be kept in its unopened vacuum-sealed package in the refrigerator up to a week past the expiration date. Once opened, keep it tightly wrapped in a zip-top bag and use within one week. Sealed packages of bacon can be frozen up to one month before the fat begins to go rancid.  Consumers these days are in a non-fat mode. As a result, pork is about fifty percent leaner today than it was 30 years ago. A three-ounce portion of lean pork is only about 200 calories. For those on high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets, bacon makes a great snack when fried up crispy. It supplies that crunch that is often missed on these diets, while most of the fat is rendered out. A standard cooked slice of bacon contains about 30 to 40 calories per slice, and even less if you cook it slowly until very crisp and drain well on paper towels. When cooking bacon, do not cook at high temperatures for long periods of time. High heat can turn the nitrite curing agents into nitrosamine. Nitrates are used to not only preserve color but also as a preservative agent to retard rancidity in the fat and kill botulism bacteria. Nitrites have been the subject of controversy as a potential cancer-causing agent in some animal experiments. There are nitrate-free bacon products on the market. Which I highly recommend. Check labels. 


Cured vs. Uncured
Curing is the process of preserving the meat and leeching out the moisture. Usually this is done by a mixture of salt, sugar, and sodium nitrates.

Uncured bacon, or bacon that does not have added nitrates, is derived from pork bellies. Uncured bacon is a misnomer because manufacturers still cure  the bacon, but use other types of natural brine. The USDA defines bacon as cured pork bellies with added synthetic nitrates or nitrites, so bacon without added chemicals is considered uncured. Bacon, either cured or uncured, is soaked in a brine to prevent botulism and to provide a recognizable flavor to the meat. Nitrates, which are naturally occurring compounds from plants, mix with certain bacteria to form into nitrites. Traditionally, bacon is cured in a mixture of salt and water with synthetic sodium nitrite added as a preservative. Uncured bacon uses a type of natural nitrates, found in celery powder or juice and sea salt, to obtain a similar bacon taste without using potentially harmful chemicals such as sodium nitrite. Uncured bacon is also known as nitrate free bacon and organic bacon. Unless it says "nitrate free" or "uncured" on the label, it will have sodium nitrates. Because of the difference in curing processes, uncured bacon is generally considered safer to eat. According to Applegate Farms, nitrites can potentially cause cancer in some situations. Under high heat, nitrites mix with amines, a compound naturally present in meat, to form nitrosamines, a carcinogen. A large-scale 2011 study published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" found that participants who consume dietary nitrites had higher levels of gastrointestinal cancer. Other research have also confirmed that nitrosamines are human carcinogens.

Smoked vs. Unsmoked

Smoked bacon is the type generally consumed in the United States. The differences come in the type of wood used to smoke the meat. This is where the unique flavors come into play, as hickory smoked bacon has a different flavor from applewood smoked bacon, which is my personal favorite. While those two, are the more common woods used to smoke bacon, there are numerous others, depending on the chef and the locale.
According to ehow.com the differences between the two bacon types come from the way in which they are cooked. The smoked bacon is just that, smoked over a specific type of wood to give it a distinct flavor, unsmoked bacon is cooked to whatever specification the chef would like, with no flavor initiated into the meat before it is sold commercially. Geography also plays a role here, as unsmoked bacon is rarely consumed in the United States.

BACON GLOSSARY:

Pancetta
Pancetta is an Italian-style bacon that is cured with salt, peppercorns and cloves. Traditionally, pancetta is not smoked. Usually, pancetta is packaged in a roll like a sausage, and is sold to order by the slice.

Irish Bacon
This smoke-cured bacon takes on the appearance of a boneless pork loin roast. Irish bacon is lean meat obtained from the "eye" part of a piece of pork loin. This bacon can be sliced to any thickness desired.

Canadian Bacon
Similar to Irish bacon, Canadian bacon is also obtained from the pork loin. It contains less fat and calories than American-style bacon. This bacon is also sometimes referred to as "back bacon" because the meat for the bacon comes from the back of the pig.

American-Style Bacon
Virginia hickory smoked bacon is one of the most common types of American-style bacon. This type of bacon comes from the stomach of the pig. American-style bacon is cured in salt and then smoked; before slicing, the rind is taken off.

Slab Bacon
Slab bacon is a large, single piece of bacon with the rind left on. This type of bacon receives additional flavor when it's smoked.

Peppered Bacon
The name of this bacon says it all: The bacon receives a spicy coating of coarsely ground black pepper.

Apple Wood-Smoked Bacon
My personal favorite is smoked from burning pieces of apple wood which is the key to curing this bacon and infusing it with a apple sweet, rich flavor.

If you are concerned about your health, talk to your doctor before changing your diet. People with certain conditions, such as hypertension, maybe should avoid most bacon because of the high sodium content. Make sure you buy uncured bacon from a reputable company that uses natural ingredients. Good Luck...





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